Our Mission

In a changing world with changing needs, the YWCA of India needs to respond effectively with timely intervention in programmes and projects that specifically address the needs of marginalized communities. It calls us to be inclusive of all communities regardless of age, class, caste, creed, religion and to be committed to protecting human dignity and environment.

Our Vision

The YWCA in India continues to be challenged in empowering women and girls to face gender inequities, social and economic disparities, caste based discrimination and all forms of violence against women. Today in a world ridden with environmental degradation, violation of human rights, the YWCA as one of the largest women’s movements is in a strong position to be an agent for social transformation and change.

THE WORLD YWCA – A PAGE FROM HISTORY

England, 1855:

Emma Roberts Prayer Union and General Female Training Institute {GFTI} founded by Hon. Mrs. Arthur Kinnaird were two women who strove to improve the situation of their fellow women – separately initially – created because of the industrial revolution and the Crimean war. Their movements grew and soon they joined forces and formed the largest world organisation of women, the YWCA with the blue triangle as it’s symbol.

1855-1875:

Various groups had already formed in Great Britain, Sweden, Denmark, France, Germany, Switzerland, USA, Canada and British Guyana. In 1894 four existing National Associations Great Britain, USA, Norway and Sweden formed the World YWCA with London as Headquarters.

1930:

The Headquarters of World YWCA was later relocated from London to Geneva Switzerland.

The current World YWCA is a global network with presence in more than 120 countries, 20000 communities and 25 million outreach programmes.

THE YWCA of INDIA – A PAGE FROM HISTORY

1875:

Miss Hariette N. Butt, a missionary formed the YWCA of Bombay along with Miss Mary Vitters, Ms, E. Mc Ritchie and Ms. Sorabji – helping in the Pillow and Flower mission for patients in hospitals and work houses.

1887:

A home for 5 young women was the start of hostels in India.

1896:

Partly due to the efforts of Ms Hill and other YMCA leaders, the forty Indian language branches and fifty English speaking branches with twenty secretaries from abroad were united by a National Committee which came to be known as YWCA of India, Burma and Ceylon.

1947:

After the partition, The YWCA of India was formed.

Today the WORLD YWCA has more than 25 million women serving 22,000 communities spread across 128 Countries. With the presence of 86 YWCAs in India and a 7000 strong volunteer force, the YWCA of India reaches out to women and girls of different ages, economic, ethnic, occupational, religious and cultural backgrounds. It is a forum for empowerment, development, growth, sharing of ideas and formation of issue based partnerships.

OUR WORK

Since the first YWCA started in Bombay in 1875, it has grown from providing accommodation to working women and students to areas of advocacy and community outreach programmes.

Advocacy action :

which strives for the removal of all forms of discrimination and violence against women in the law, media, employment, status at home and in other spheres of life. It networks with other women’s organization and has proactively collaborated in the framing of drafts for Bills and Legislations. The YWCA of India also serves on Complaints Committees set up by Ministries, Government institutions and Public Sector Undertakings for prevention of sexual harassment at the workplace

Community Development services:

The YWCA works to improve survival, protection and participation of children of all ages through early childhood care, education programmes and advocacy for their rights. It has adopted a programmatic and multi-faceted approach to improve the quality of living in areas of education, economy and health. It also conducts Family Life Education for Adolescent Girls programmes and leadership development workshops and trainings. The YWCA also works to prevent child marriage and assists young and vulnerable mothers through various community initiatives and livelihood programs.

Other services:

YWCA of India also offers, hostels for working women and students, schools emphasizing a high standard to value based education, counselling and crisis centres, vocational training centres, school for the differently challenged, crèches and about 45 guest houses.

Our Projects:

The YWCA of India’s Community Development Project – Pippal Chhaya in TrilokPuri, Delhi:

This is a resettlement colony that focuses on empowering the children, especially girls, through education, socio – economic awareness and advocacy sessions on social issues, English and computer classes, fitness activities, character building workshops, health care through fun activities which are both engaging and informative.

Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights:

Projects on Sexual and Reproductive health and rights are conducted and these focus on educating youth on issues such as HIV/AIDS and Drug abuse. Training on gender justice for children at schools is also a key area of our work.

The YWCA of India – Dehradun { Spreadacre’s Project}:

This property, had been providing residence to the senior citizens who had decided to spend their retired life in this beautiful town. In 2010, the Home lost the last of its residents and the YWCA of India decided to renovate the heritage Cottage before new residents took up accommodation which is now reopening on 4th September 2016.

The Day Care Centre which has been functioning since 1986 on this property has been providing day care facilities to 30 senior persons. Recreational programmes, camps, income generation, rehabilitation, financial and medical aid are provided from this unit.

Guest Houses:

The guest houses run by the YWCA of India in Ootacamund, Coonoor, Nainital, Delhi and Mussoorie help raise funds for our work and provide clean, comfortable and safe accommodation for travellers.

The YWCA also offers services like hostels for working women and students, schools emphasising a high standard to value based education, counselling and crisis centres, vocational training centres, schools for the differently challenged, creches and about 45 guest houses.

OUR PURPOSE:

Being one of the largest women’s movements, the YWCA of India is in a strong position to be an agent for social transformation and change. We network with the government, policy makers, corporations, local communities and the general public. Our programmes in the communities aim at holistic development of women and girls making them employable citizens with a deep sense of commitment to society. The intent is to develop a scalable and sustainable model for development.

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